Trans Healthcare Guidelines

Can trans and non-binary people donate blood, tissue, and/or organs?

Yes. All people who are - fit and healthy - weigh between 7 stone 12 lbs and 25 stone (or 50kg and 158kg) - aged between 17 and 66 (or 70 if you have given blood before) are eligible to donate blood and tissue, regardless of gender identity. NHS Blood & Transplant considers all donors to be the gender/sex with which they identify, including non-binary, genderfluid, and agender donors. However, because some blood products can be manufactured from people assigned male at birth but no...

Do you need a court order to get gender affirming treatment?

No. The advice from the General Medical Council (https://www.gmc-uk.org/ethical-guidance/ethical-guidance-for-doctors/0-18-years/making-decisions) is clear on the need for court involvement in patients’ care: ‘If a child lacks the capacity to consent, you should ask for their parent’s consent. It is usually sufficient to have consent from one parent. If parents cannot agree and disputes cannot be resolved informally, you should seek legal advice about whether you should apply to the court.’

Is transgender healthcare experimental?

In its 2016 statement (https://www.wpath.org/newsroom/medical-necessity-statement), the WPATH clearly states that ‘These medical procedures and treatment protocols are not experimental: Decades of both clinical experience and medical research show they are essential to achieving well-being for the transsexual patient.’

What are the risks of withholding treatment for trans adolescents?

According to the Women and Equalities Report 2016: ‘We recognise that there are legitimate concerns among service-users and their families about the clinical protocols which the clinic operates regarding access to puberty-blockers and cross-sex hormones. Failing to intervene in this way, or unnecessarily delaying such intervention, clearly has the potential to lead to seriously damaging consequences for very vulnerable young people, including the risk of self-harm and attempted suicide. ‘T...

What are the criteria for gender-affirming care for adults?

The (https://www.gires.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/int-gend-proto.pdf)NHS England’s current commissioning protocol (https://www.gires.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/int-gend-proto.pdf) relates to the treatment of adults over the age of 17. All of the health professionals that our patients are referred to for support and evaluation specialise in gender dysphoria and have extensive experience in the assessment of management of patients who may have associated mental or emotional distres...

Can you have NHS and private healthcare?

In their policy on shared care, NHS England quotes three main principles from Department of Health Guidance: 1. The NHS should not withdraw NHS care because a patient chooses to buy private care, nor should patients who access private care be placed at an advantage or disadvantage in relation to the NHS care they receive. 2. The NHS should continue to provide free of charge all care that the patient would have been entitled to had they not chosen to have additional private care. 3. Wher...

Is there a way of diagnosing someone as trans?

As it is a subjective experience, the only person that can actually know whether or not they are trans is the person living with feelings of gender incongruence (the feeling that one’s gender does not align with the one they were assigned at birth). There is no psychological test, blood test or medical scan. It is not something someone chooses to be, and it is certainly not a mental disorder.

What is the clinical basis for treating children as young as 10?

Leading experts agree (https://www.wpath.org/media/cms/Documents/Public%20Policies/2020/FINAL%20Statement%20Regarding%20Informed%20Consent%20Court%20Case_Dec%2016%202020.docx.pdf?_t=1608225376) that: "[puberty suppression and subsequent gender affirming hormones] is the most widely accepted and preferred clinical approach in health services for transgender people around the world. The aim of puberty suppression is to prevent the psychological suffering which stems from# undesired physical change...

What are the benefits of gender affirming care?

In their joint statement (https://www.wpath.org/media/cms/Documents/Public%20Policies/2020/FINAL%20Statement%20Regarding%20Informed%20Consent%20Court%20Case_Dec%2016%202020.docx.pdf?_t=1608225376), issued in response to the Bell v Tavistock ruling, world leading experts in transgender healthcare WPATH et al. explain that: "although treatment for young transgender adolescents involves uncertainties, as is the case in many fields involving young people, several studies demonstrate the clear mental...

What guidelines are available in the UK for the treatment of trans youth?

There are no UK NHS published guidelines for the care of transgender people (https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jul/29/transgender-healthcare-practice-hormones). The Gender Identity Development Service provides NHS care to UK trans youth according to Service Specifications (https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/gender-identity-development-service-for-children-and-adolescent-service-specification/). This is their own protocol which differs widely from those used by centres of excelle...

How does informed consent work?

Our model of informed consent ensures that, before any irreversible or life-altering medication is taken, all patients know what the effects would be, both psychologically and medically. We have a very experienced team of doctors, counsellors and psychologists on hand for consultations at every stage of the process. Current best practice is to make counselling, psychotherapy and support (https://www.gendergp.com/therapy/) available at any stage of a trans person’s journey, and while this is cert...

Why is there so much controversy around trans healthcare?

In recent years, understanding around what it means to be transgender has increased significantly. This has led to many more people stepping forward and asking for help with their social, medical and legal transition. In many countries, medical services have failed to keep up with demand, with too few healthcare professionals feeling able, or willing to help. A reluctance all too often driven by social, medical and political prejudice. These factors have also driven the wider narrative on trans ...

Is it legal to provide trans healthcare?

Yes! The NHS has a legal duty to provide this care. While the UK is falling behind in its provision to the trans community - and specifically trans youth - leading centres of excellence (https://www.wpath.org/policies)worldwide (https://www.wpath.org/policies) have issued clear guidance in recent years which promotes the benefits of affirmative care. At GenderGP we follow this best practice to ensure all trans individuals, wherever they are in the world and however old they are, have access to ...

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